Hier, dans le cadre du Forum Social des Peuples qui avait lieu ce week-end à Ottawa, un pow-wow avait lieu près du parlement. Voici quelques portraits et courtes entrevues réalisés sur place.

  Sky Hendrickson -  Exeter, Ontario        «I came to this Peoples Social Forum so that I could learn more about first nations cultures. Canada, belongs to them, and it’s should still belongs to them.»

Sky Hendrickson -  Exeter, Ontario    

«I came to this Peoples Social Forum so that I could learn more about first nations cultures. Canada, belongs to them, and it’s should still belongs to them.»

  A.J. Helliot - White Fish Lake / Ojibwa Atikameksheng Anishnawbek First Nation.    «Everyone came here to enjoy the pow-wow. People come out to these pow-wow to socialize and to have fun at the gatherings. Today, I was asked to be head dancer, I’m from 4 hours drive from here, and I came.     There are actually a couple things going around here in Ottawa, like Idle No More movement. Lots of stuff is going around here, for the rights of first nations. »

A.J. Helliot - White Fish Lake / Ojibwa Atikameksheng Anishnawbek First Nation.

«Everyone came here to enjoy the pow-wow. People come out to these pow-wow to socialize and to have fun at the gatherings. Today, I was asked to be head dancer, I’m from 4 hours drive from here, and I came.

There are actually a couple things going around here in Ottawa, like Idle No More movement. Lots of stuff is going around here, for the rights of first nations. »

  Candyce Paul - English River First Nation, Northern Saskatchewan     «  I came here to get the message out about the uranium mining and the nuclear waste in our territory and how it’s affecting our people. In the last days, at the Peoples Social Forum, I got to participate in three workshops on those issues.    I’m really glad that this forum was put together, because it has brought people together from across the country. This allowed us to make connections that we wouldn’t have been able to make otherwise.»

Candyce Paul - English River First Nation, Northern Saskatchewan

 «I came here to get the message out about the uranium mining and the nuclear waste in our territory and how it’s affecting our people. In the last days, at the Peoples Social Forum, I got to participate in three workshops on those issues.

I’m really glad that this forum was put together, because it has brought people together from across the country. This allowed us to make connections that we wouldn’t have been able to make otherwise.»

  C. - Toronto    «I think any social movement taking place on turtle island should at the very least acknowledge that this is stolen land, and that this land is originally Turtle Island. The process of social and political transformations has to come with respect with the original inhabitants of this land. A lot the solutions we need starts by understanding the ways indigenous peoples around the world have lived in balance with the land and the environment. We really have to try to re-learn those lessons, to listen to them, and to respect this land.    Because our current culture is based on destroying all life in the search of profits. A lot of people think humans are inherently bad or can’t live sustainably, but indigenous peoples, from the beginning of time of human beings, have lived in balance, and could lived in balance for a thousands of years more. If we want to survive as a species, it’s key that we learn those lessons and have indigenous peoples at the front, leading, connecting with the land, and as well with their spirit.       That’s what’s powerful about the pow-wows: is reconnecting with the spirits through the songs, the dances and the drums. I think that’s a key aspect as we move forward in our culture of resistance: to have that power, to give us the strength to move forward.»

C. - Toronto

«I think any social movement taking place on turtle island should at the very least acknowledge that this is stolen land, and that this land is originally Turtle Island. The process of social and political transformations has to come with respect with the original inhabitants of this land. A lot the solutions we need starts by understanding the ways indigenous peoples around the world have lived in balance with the land and the environment. We really have to try to re-learn those lessons, to listen to them, and to respect this land.

Because our current culture is based on destroying all life in the search of profits. A lot of people think humans are inherently bad or can’t live sustainably, but indigenous peoples, from the beginning of time of human beings, have lived in balance, and could lived in balance for a thousands of years more. If we want to survive as a species, it’s key that we learn those lessons and have indigenous peoples at the front, leading, connecting with the land, and as well with their spirit. 

That’s what’s powerful about the pow-wows: is reconnecting with the spirits through the songs, the dances and the drums. I think that’s a key aspect as we move forward in our culture of resistance: to have that power, to give us the strength to move forward.»

  Tori Cress –     Chimnissing -   Wahta Mohawk Territory     «  I’m here today for the generations to come. It’s important that we come here and support our First People. The pow-wow is a intrical part of our celebrations and we need to be here to support the First Nations people so we’re not marginalized at the Peoples Social Forum. By coming to the Forum, I could meet in person people and activists that I had only met online before.»

Tori Cress – Chimnissing - Wahta Mohawk Territory

 «I’m here today for the generations to come. It’s important that we come here and support our First People. The pow-wow is a intrical part of our celebrations and we need to be here to support the First Nations people so we’re not marginalized at the Peoples Social Forum. By coming to the Forum, I could meet in person people and activists that I had only met online before.»

  John Underwood - Exeter, Ontario    «It starts with nature, and the love for nature. And then it goes towards why we don’t threat nature the way we actually should, and feel like we should in our hearts. We betray ourselves, and our fellow humans, in the world around us when we don’t threat it right. The holistic nature of the indigenous folks, which happens to be so oppressed from our own government for years, is what we need to become healthier. »

John Underwood - Exeter, Ontario

«It starts with nature, and the love for nature. And then it goes towards why we don’t threat nature the way we actually should, and feel like we should in our hearts. We betray ourselves, and our fellow humans, in the world around us when we don’t threat it right. The holistic nature of the indigenous folks, which happens to be so oppressed from our own government for years, is what we need to become healthier. »

  Linda - Fort Albany cree Northern James Bay, now living in Ottawa    «I participated in this Peoples Social Forum because of what has been going on in different native communities. The Social Forum is here to explain in details what is going on in each villages and communities, because aboriginals are losing a lot of their land, their identities, their status.    The pow-wow, that we’re trying to create for the youth to continue with our traditional values. Especially the dancing, the medicine wheels, theirs backgrounds, that is their identity. I wish for more work for the youth, but not in the mining, with all what’s going on. We just trying to get our rights back.      It took me 3 years before I converted to Islam, and then in 2007 I converted. I was searching for something. Seriously, I was sick and tired of the way I was living. You know, about residential schools survivors, I’m one of them…you tend to drink, to do drugs, you can’t talk to anybody. I tried many religions. I tried to help myself, and I was tired the way I was. Islam was my last chance. I just studied it for some time, converted, and now look at me, sober! Alcohol free! Now I’m just trying to help people, especially the youth. My hearth desires more youth to participate at these things (the pow-wows), they don’t have to be dancers, but to participate, to come to the workshops, all these things, to go to organizations just to get involved.        I try to bring Muslims people and try to incorporate Muslims community with the First Nations community, so they can work together, instead of working separated. Because that’s what’s I told them: we might as well work together.   I’m a out reach coordinator for a Islam center, I work outside communicating with difference organizations. I do small workshops at the center, with indigenous people, for conversations. Explaining also to Muslims, what is our aboriginal reality, how much we get from the government, the treat rights, 4$ a year… I’m gonna do more, I’ll invite Native organizations to come to Muslim people, to give them the knowledge of our people, and talk about our issues. Muslim people they have problems, us, first nations, we have problems, we might as well work together somehow. »

Linda - Fort Albany cree Northern James Bay, now living in Ottawa

«I participated in this Peoples Social Forum because of what has been going on in different native communities. The Social Forum is here to explain in details what is going on in each villages and communities, because aboriginals are losing a lot of their land, their identities, their status.

The pow-wow, that we’re trying to create for the youth to continue with our traditional values. Especially the dancing, the medicine wheels, theirs backgrounds, that is their identity. I wish for more work for the youth, but not in the mining, with all what’s going on. We just trying to get our rights back.  

It took me 3 years before I converted to Islam, and then in 2007 I converted. I was searching for something. Seriously, I was sick and tired of the way I was living. You know, about residential schools survivors, I’m one of them…you tend to drink, to do drugs, you can’t talk to anybody. I tried many religions. I tried to help myself, and I was tired the way I was. Islam was my last chance. I just studied it for some time, converted, and now look at me, sober! Alcohol free! Now I’m just trying to help people, especially the youth. My hearth desires more youth to participate at these things (the pow-wows), they don’t have to be dancers, but to participate, to come to the workshops, all these things, to go to organizations just to get involved.  

I try to bring Muslims people and try to incorporate Muslims community with the First Nations community, so they can work together, instead of working separated. Because that’s what’s I told them: we might as well work together. I’m a out reach coordinator for a Islam center, I work outside communicating with difference organizations. I do small workshops at the center, with indigenous people, for conversations. Explaining also to Muslims, what is our aboriginal reality, how much we get from the government, the treat rights, 4$ a year… I’m gonna do more, I’ll invite Native organizations to come to Muslim people, to give them the knowledge of our people, and talk about our issues. Muslim people they have problems, us, first nations, we have problems, we might as well work together somehow. »

   
  
 
  
    
  
 Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 FR 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:12.0pt;
	font-family:Cambria;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-ansi-language:FR;}
 
     Elizabeth Toronto -      «  I love pow-wows, and I love signing and dancing. I like to sing. I know some of these songs! To me, this isn’t a political act, I would be here, if it had nothing to do with the forum.    But we were just commenting…with the Idle No More movement, there is a lot of resurgence for native people to bend together around a lot of issues.    I have some native roots, but I actually don’t know what nation. But I got more got involved with it, at a cultural level. Someone invited me to a ceremony they were doing, then we had to go to a sweat lodge. Then I really got into it, so I started going to sweat lodges all the time. I made tipis, and I made drums. »

Elizabeth Toronto -

 «I love pow-wows, and I love signing and dancing. I like to sing. I know some of these songs! To me, this isn’t a political act, I would be here, if it had nothing to do with the forum.

But we were just commenting…with the Idle No More movement, there is a lot of resurgence for native people to bend together around a lot of issues.

I have some native roots, but I actually don’t know what nation. But I got more got involved with it, at a cultural level. Someone invited me to a ceremony they were doing, then we had to go to a sweat lodge. Then I really got into it, so I started going to sweat lodges all the time. I made tipis, and I made drums. »

   
  
 
  
    
  
 Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 FR 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:12.0pt;
	font-family:Cambria;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-ansi-language:FR;}
 
     Joan - From Montreal, living in Ottawa    «I am a drummer, a drum carrier. I know a lot indigenous people in Ottawa, that are here. Their rights, or should I say their lack of rights, is an issue that is very important to me to fight for. I consider my self a proud ally.»

Joan - From Montreal, living in Ottawa

«I am a drummer, a drum carrier. I know a lot indigenous people in Ottawa, that are here. Their rights, or should I say their lack of rights, is an issue that is very important to me to fight for. I consider my self a proud ally.»

 Neil - Peoplea Social Forum Pow-wow organizer  « I was asked to organize the traditional pow-wow for the Peoples Social Forum. Basically, I think it’s important to have the pow-wow at the social forum specifically, because we’re bringing in people from all around to the Peoples Forum in Ottawa. It gives us a chance to paint another picture of indigenous life, and show another side of our people. Basically [It gives us a chance] to celebrate our uniqueness and what makes us special, or one of the things that makes us special, which is our love for dancing, our love for music, for the drum, celebrating our connexions with mother.»  

Neil - Peoplea Social Forum Pow-wow organizer

«I was asked to organize the traditional pow-wow for the Peoples Social Forum. Basically, I think it’s important to have the pow-wow at the social forum specifically, because we’re bringing in people from all around to the Peoples Forum in Ottawa. It gives us a chance to paint another picture of indigenous life, and show another side of our people. Basically [It gives us a chance] to celebrate our uniqueness and what makes us special, or one of the things that makes us special, which is our love for dancing, our love for music, for the drum, celebrating our connexions with mother.» 

  Kathryn O’neil - Ottawa    «I think all of the groups that have come together are linked. No matter what, we all live in Canada, we all breath the same air, drink the same water. Indigenous people are the first people of Canada, and they have an important role to play in the future. »

Kathryn O’neil - Ottawa

«I think all of the groups that have come together are linked. No matter what, we all live in Canada, we all breath the same air, drink the same water. Indigenous people are the first people of Canada, and they have an important role to play in the future. »

  Gabrielle Victoria Fayant - Fishing Lake Alberta Live in Algonquin territory - C  o-founder of Assembly of Seven Generations    «I’m attending the pow-wow because I always attend pow-wows when they happen! I enjoy singing with the big drums and the hand drums. I really like coming to see the community. I really think it’s important for all activists to see how connected they are to the indigenous struggles, how mutual and commons are our concerns.    Also, activists who, say, are involved in environmentalism, if they understand the indigenous perspective to the land, it can really change and empower them to continue what they’re doing, and to also walk side by side with indigenous people.     A lot of the work I do is with indigenous youth, that’s my main focus. I’m actually co-founder of a youth organization called Assembly of Seven Generations, and we really came out of the spirit of idle no more, and we’re continuating on that momentum, in our own way.    It’s really nice to see so many people learning more about indigenous ways, culture and history. I really think we are on the peak of something really amazing.»

Gabrielle Victoria Fayant - Fishing Lake Alberta Live in Algonquin territory - Co-founder of Assembly of Seven Generations

«I’m attending the pow-wow because I always attend pow-wows when they happen! I enjoy singing with the big drums and the hand drums. I really like coming to see the community. I really think it’s important for all activists to see how connected they are to the indigenous struggles, how mutual and commons are our concerns.

Also, activists who, say, are involved in environmentalism, if they understand the indigenous perspective to the land, it can really change and empower them to continue what they’re doing, and to also walk side by side with indigenous people. 

A lot of the work I do is with indigenous youth, that’s my main focus. I’m actually co-founder of a youth organization called Assembly of Seven Generations, and we really came out of the spirit of idle no more, and we’re continuating on that momentum, in our own way.

It’s really nice to see so many people learning more about indigenous ways, culture and history. I really think we are on the peak of something really amazing.»

  James Phelan - Ottawa     «  We’re here to bring the people together, that’s what it is. If you can’t be together, there’s no peace. And that’s why we trying for, peace for everybody. All this violence it’s got to stop. That’s why we bring this pow-wow in Ottawa. I dance in pow-wow very often. We have pow-wows here six times a year. There are always pow-wows in Ottawa, and I’m actually the vice president for the pow-wows in Ottawa.»

James Phelan - Ottawa

 «We’re here to bring the people together, that’s what it is. If you can’t be together, there’s no peace. And that’s why we trying for, peace for everybody. All this violence it’s got to stop. That’s why we bring this pow-wow in Ottawa. I dance in pow-wow very often. We have pow-wows here six times a year. There are always pow-wows in Ottawa, and I’m actually the vice president for the pow-wows in Ottawa.»

   
  
 
  
    
  
 Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 FR 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:12.0pt;
	font-family:Cambria;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-ansi-language:FR;}
 
   Casina Land - Ojibwe First Nation    «   I’m attending this pow-wow because it’s my culture, and I really enjoy these events. I can learn all kind of teachings, and everyone gathers around. It’s amazing! It’s important for everyone to get involved, to feel a part of something, and this is what the Peoples Social Forum is all about, making sure everyone is part of something.»

Casina Land - Ojibwe First Nation

« I’m attending this pow-wow because it’s my culture, and I really enjoy these events. I can learn all kind of teachings, and everyone gathers around. It’s amazing! It’s important for everyone to get involved, to feel a part of something, and this is what the Peoples Social Forum is all about, making sure everyone is part of something.»

   
  
 
  
    
  
 Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 FR 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:12.0pt;
	font-family:Cambria;
	mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria;
	mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria;
	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;
	mso-ansi-language:FR;}
 
     Patrice James - Ottawa    «I’m the director of an artist run center called the Independent Filmmakers Co-operative of Ottawa Inc, (IFCO). I found about this pow-wow through an artist exhibition I went to this afternoon. I’ve attended a couple of pow-wows in the past and I enjoy them, I love the dancing, the colours, and seeing people from all around come together to experience a unique part of Canadian culture.»

Patrice James - Ottawa

«I’m the director of an artist run center called the Independent Filmmakers Co-operative of Ottawa Inc, (IFCO). I found about this pow-wow through an artist exhibition I went to this afternoon. I’ve attended a couple of pow-wows in the past and I enjoy them, I love the dancing, the colours, and seeing people from all around come together to experience a unique part of Canadian culture.»